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  • Writer's pictureS. Anne Marie Archer

Understanding Your Workplace Rights as a Contractor

Updated: Mar 4

Disclaimer: The information provided in this blog post is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. It is important to consult with legal professionals for guidance on specific legal matters.

Results on engagements and online courses may vary, successful outcome is not guaranteed.




In today’s employment landscape the distinction between contractors and regular employees has become increasingly significant and is often blurred. While both contribute to the success of a business, the classifications possess distinct legal and financial implications. This blog post aims to shed light on the differences between contractors and regular employees in the United States, emphasizing the impact of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) on these classifications. Additionally, we will explore the reasons why employers may prefer classifying individuals as contractors and discuss the actions an employee can take if they believe they have been misclassified.

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA): The FLSA is a federal law enacted in 1938 that establishes various labor standards, including minimum wage, overtime pay, and child labor provisions, to ensure fair working conditions for employees. It distinguishes between contractors and employees and sets guidelines for their classification. However, it is important to note that the classification of an individual is determined by the nature of their work and not solely by their job title or the agreement they signed.

If you have been classified as a contractor by your employer ensure that you have a contractor agreement that fully describes the scope and terms of your employment. Everything you do for your now Client/Employer should be governed by the four corners of that document. If you are asked to do anything that is not in your contract, request an update or amendment and ensure you also seek to negotiate additional renumeration for any additional work.

Key Differences between Contractors and Employees:


1. Control and Independence: Contractors typically maintain a greater degree of control and independence over their work compared to employees. They have the freedom to choose when, where, and how they perform their tasks, while employees often work under the direct supervision and control of their employers. 2. Financial Arrangements: Contractors are responsible for their own business expenses, such as equipment, tools, and supplies. They also handle their taxes, including self-employment taxes. In contrast, employees have their expenses covered by the employer, and the employer withholds taxes from their wages. 3. Legal Protections and Benefits: Employees are entitled to a range of legal protections and benefits, such as minimum wage, overtime pay, workers' compensation, unemployment insurance, and employer-provided benefits (e.g., healthcare, retirement plans). Contractors, on the other hand, are not covered by these protections and benefits, as they are considered independent entities.


Reasons Employers Prefer Contractor Classification:


1. Cost Savings: Employers often prefer classifying individuals as contractors to reduce costs. Contractors are responsible for their own taxes, benefits, and insurance, thereby alleviating the financial burden on the employer. They also do not receive benefits typically offered to employees, further reducing expenses. 2. Flexibility and Specialized Skills: Contractors provide employers with flexibility in staffing. They can be hired for specific projects or during busy periods, avoiding the long-term commitment associated with regular employees. Additionally, contractors often possess specialized skills or expertise that can be tapped into on an as-needed basis. 3. Reduced Legal Obligations: Classifying individuals as contractors reduces employers' legal obligations. Employers do not have to comply with various labor laws and regulations applicable to employees, including minimum wage requirements, overtime pay, and payroll taxes. This offers greater administrative simplicity and potential liability reduction.


Dealing with Misclassification: If you believe you have been misclassified as a contractor, it is essential to take action. The following steps can be considered:


1. Gather Information: Collect relevant documents, such as employment agreements, job descriptions, and evidence of work arrangements, to support your case. Consult legal resources, online materials, or professional advice to understand the specific criteria for contractor classification in your jurisdiction. Like a regular employee I highly recommend that you document the workplace and track any irregularities or illegal treatment or behavior by using my Documentation Journal. 2. Communicate with the Employer: After you have appropriated collected all documentation of your situation, consider approaching your hiring employer/HR to express your concerns regarding misclassification. Understand that retaliation is possible so have a strategy that includes this possibility before approaching HR or your manager. Provide HR with a summary of your concerns and make them aware that you have supporting evidence (but do not share it) and request a reevaluation of your classification. Document all aspects of your communications with your employer and HR and be prepared to escalate if they are not cooperative; or if any retaliatory action occurs like the termination of your contract. 3. Seek Counsel and advice: If the employer refuses to change your classification, consult a professional experienced in human resources and/or labor law such as a Labor and Employment Lawyer. They can help assess your situation, guide you through the appropriate process and procedure to ensure your interest are protected and the proper course is taken.


What to Do As a Contractor When Faced with Workplace Discrimination and/or Bias Discrimination can undermine a contractor's ability to work in a fair and respectful environment. Here is some guidance on what you can do if you believe you are being subjected to discrimination at work by a client.

If you are in fact correctly classified as a Contractor and you are confronted with Discrimination in your workplace, what should you do? It is likely that your actual employer is a firm/company that placed you in another place to work, or you were hired direct as a contractor/free-lancer, so, what’s your recourse if you encounter discrimination at work?

First Recognize the Discrimination: Discrimination can take various forms, including but not limited to, race, gender, age, religion, disability, or sexual orientation. It may manifest through unfair treatment, harassment, denial of opportunities, or a hostile work environment. It is crucial for contractors to be aware of their rights and recognize when they are being subjected to discriminatory practices. Check out my blog post about what discrimination is and is not.

Steps for Addressing Discrimination:

  1. Document the Incidents: Keep a detailed record of the discriminatory incidents, including dates, times, locations, individuals involved, and a description of what transpired. Collect any supporting evidence, such as emails, messages, or witnesses who can corroborate your experiences. This documentation will serve as crucial evidence if you decide to take further action. Use My Documentation to track and keep record of the incidents.

  2. Review the Contract and Company Policies: Examine your contract and the policies of the company you are contracted with to understand if they address discrimination and provide guidance on reporting such incidents. Familiarize yourself with any procedures or channels available for raising concerns or complaints. Also review the company policies of the company you have been assigned to work if the entities are not the same.

  3. Communicate with the Client: Initiate a conversation with the client through its HR department to address your concerns about the discriminatory treatment you have experienced. Clearly and professionally express your objections, referring to specific incidents and the impact they have had on your ability to perform your work. It is possible that the client may not be aware of the situation and discussing the issue could lead to a resolution. Be aware that raising your concerns with the Client could also lead to termination of your contract. Take your understanding of your environment and workplace into consideration and have a plan for what you will do if your contract is terminated after you raise your concerns. Make sure you have fully documented and that all documentation needed I under your control before going to the client. If you are not absolutely sure your access to future work assignments will not be impacted by raising your concerns, go to #5 before you say anything to your supervisory company.

  4. Communicate with your supervisory company if they are not the Client: Initiate a conversation with the Employer if they are not the Client, to address your concerns about the discriminatory treatment you have experienced. Clearly and professionally express your objections, referring to specific incidents and the impact they have had on your ability to perform your work. It is possible that the Company that placed you on the assignment does not have awareness of the situation and discussing the issue could lead to a resolution. Be aware that raising your concerns could also lead to termination of your contract and impact your ability to get additional assignments. It is quite possible that your company does know about the issues with the Client and has decided that its profits matter more than your interest. Have a plan for what you will do if your contract is terminated after you raise your concerns. Make sure you have fully documented and that all documentation needed I under your control before going to the client. If you are not absolutely sure your access to future work assignments will not be impacted by raising your concerns, go to #5 before you say anything to your supervisory company.

  5. Get Advice and Support: Contact me to help you develop a strategy and plan of action BEFORE you raise concerns with your employer/Client. I will help you get in front of all aspects of the situation to ensure you have the outcome you want and deserve. If you already reported your concerns and the client/employer failed to address your concerns or retaliated against you for raising the issue, reach out to me for advice on actions you can take including getting the remainder of your contract paid out. Just because you are contractor does not mean you don’t have workplace rights. If you want to take legal action, seek advice from an employment attorney. They can assess the situation, review your documentation, and provide guidance on the appropriate legal steps to take.

  6. File a Complaint with the Appropriate Agency: Depending on the nature of the discrimination, you may need to file a complaint with the relevant government agency. For example, if the discrimination is based on race, gender, or age, you may file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or an equivalent state agency. Consult an attorney to determine the appropriate agency and to assist you in preparing and filing the complaint.

  7. Consider Terminating the Contract: In severe cases where the discriminatory behavior persists despite your efforts to address it, you may need to evaluate whether it is in your best interest to terminate the contract with the client. This decision should be made after considering the potential financial implications and getting advice from an experienced professional.


As a Contractor you deserve a workplace free from discrimination, just like regular employees. If faced with discriminatory treatment by a client, it is crucial to take appropriate action to protect your rights and well-being. By documenting incidents, communicating with the client, seeking professional advice, and filing complaints, when necessary, you can advocate for fair treatment and potentially hold the responsible party accountable. Remember, consulting someone like me and/or an employment attorney will provide you with the guidance needed to navigate through this complex process.


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Disclaimer: The information provided in this blog post is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. It is important to consult with legal professionals for guidance on specific legal matters.


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